Audioslave: The Tragic Story Of the Band

The Rise and Fall of Audioslave

Today on Rock N’ Roll True Stories they take a look at the rise and fall of the supergroup Audioslave. Check it out below!

I’ve covered a few supergroups on my channel including Temple of the Dog and Velvet Revolver. The links to the stories of those bands are below. You’ll notice one common theme about a lot of musical supergroups and that’s that they don’t really last very long. Audioslave lasted about as long as Velvet Revolver, but had more musical output and today we’re going to explore the history of the band. How they came together, their music, and their eventual end. Stay tuned for the full story. Audioslave’s origins dated back to 2000 when Rage Against the Machine fell apart after frontman Zach De La Rocha quit the group. I’ve done a whole video on the reason he left the group the band, the link is down belowin the description box below. The remaining members of Rage decided to find a new singer under a moniker and It was rumored initially that Layne Staley of Alice in Chains was considered to front the band, but guitarist Tom Morello has since quashed those rumors. It was also reported that B-Real of Cypress Hill was also a possibility to front the group, but the band didn’t want to replicate the sound of Rage. The spark that got Audioslave started was producer Rick Rubin who suggested that Tom Morello and company, meet Chris Cornell. Cornell’s previous band Soundgarden called it a day in 1997 and he had since moved onto becoming a solo artist releasing his debut album Euphoria Morning in 1999. At the time Cornell was working on his his second solo record, but once the singer got a call from Rubin to meet up with the guys from Rage Against the Machine he shelved his solo plans. During their first rehearsal together, the newquartet wrote the song “light my way”. That collaboration continued to be fruitful with the musicians writing 20 songs in just 3 weeks. With enough songs written for an album, the band entered the studio in the summer of 2001, shuttling between Los Angeles and Seattle with Rick Rubin. The album would be complete the following year. Guitarist Tom Morello would tell Rolling Stone how instantaneous the chemistry with Cornell was revealing “He stepped to the microphone and sang the song and I couldn’t believe it. It didn’t just sound good, it sounded transcendent. When there is an irreplaceable chemistry from the first moment, you can’t deny it” he’d say. Cornell never doubted his chemistry with his band members, as he credited them with helping him get through a difficult period in time. It was during the early days of Audioslave he was going through a divorce from his longtime wife Susan Silver and at the same time dealing with alcohol addiction. Cornell would recall that period in his life during the making of the first Audioslave record saying “During the period when we made the first Audioslave record, I was going through a horrible personal crisis,” “Before the record was even released, I went through rehab and my relationship ended. Then I stopped drinking and started re-focusing and wonderful things started happening. But, not everything was going well for the band. In fact Chris Cornell quit the band before they even put out their first record. In March of 2002, Audioslave announced plans to play Ozzfest that summer, But Cornell quit the bands 3 days later and the Ozzfest tour dates were scrapped. The singer would return to the band six weeks later. And the fallout happened because Cornell and the former Rage members management companies had a long-standing feud. The band eventu

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